A Novel Look Logo.png

Happy Reading Bookworms!

Book Review: Bloomability by Sharon Creech

Book Review: Bloomability by Sharon Creech

Bloomability.jpg

Bloomability was my favorite book growing up. I read a lot of Sharon Creech, but Bloomability was always my favorite. A boarding school in Switzerland? Sign me up. A few months ago, my library was having a book sale, and I came across a used copy of it. Obviously I snatched it up as quickly as possible.

Bloomability tells the the story of Domenica Santolina Doone, or better known as Dinnie. She and her family bounce around the United States, while her dad goes from job to job. She does not really know her mother’s family, but after her sister finds herself pregnant, her mother’s sister Sandy and her husband Max come to take Dinnie to Switzerland with them. Uncle Max is the new headmaster at an American school just outside of Lugano, Switzerland. Dinnie feels like she is being kidnapped at first, taken away from her family. She is scared to leave the United States and spend a year away from her family in a country where she knows no one and lives with two people she has just met.

But as school starts, she makes new friends from all over the world, like Keisuke from Japan and Belen from Spain. Lila, an American whose parents live in Saudi Arabia, quickly befriends Dinnie, but constantly complains about everything. Guthrie is also an American; he is always enthusiastic about everything and constantly sprinkles Italian phrases into conversation (fantastico!). Dinnie has always moved around, but in Switzerland, she finds a group of friends who embrace her just the way she is.

I still remember reading this as a child and wanting to go to boarding school so badly in Switzerland. And now probably 17 years later, I still find that I want to go to boarding school in Switzerland, to ski with Guthrie, make friends with Belen and Keisuke, and explore all the bloomabilities out there.

Keisuke has a hard time with certain English words at first, but at one point, he says bloomable, when he actually means possible. From then on, Creech uses bloomability to mean possibility. At the end of the story, Dinnie realizes there are lots of bloomabilities.

I was a little worried that I would only like Bloomability now for nostalgic reasons, but I am happy to report that it still is a great story almost two decades later and definitely holds up. I give it 5 stars!

Let me know if your favorite childhood books still hold up as an adult.

Book Review: Young Jane Young by Gabrielle Zevin

Book Review: Young Jane Young by Gabrielle Zevin

Book Review: The Summer Before the War by Helen Simonson

Book Review: The Summer Before the War by Helen Simonson