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Romantic Comedy Recap 3.14.18

Romantic Comedy Recap 3.14.18

Back again with more romantic comedies. When I need a break from harder reads (or you know, the news and state of the world), I like to read fun, light reads. I picked up Christina Lauren on the recommendation of Amy at Read a Latte. And then obviously more Penny Reid. She is just the best. But now I'm all caught up with Reid's work, and I have to wait until July when her next book comes out. It's too long, Penny, too long.

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Roomies by Christina Lauren is the story of Holland, an aspiring writer, and Calvin, an Irish musician. Holland frequently visits the subway station where Calvin plays the guitar. One night a drunk hobo pushes Holland onto the tracks, Calvin calls 911 to rescue her. But when Holland’s uncle, a Broadway composer (think Lin-Manuel Miranda), needs a new musician, Holland takes him to see Calvin. The only problem is that Calvin’s visa has lapsed, and he is in the US illegally. Cue Holland offering to marry him, even though she has a massive crush on him. As the two get married and have to make it seem like a real marriage, Holland and Calvin find love with each other, but will it be enough? I really enjoyed this one, probably mostly because Calvin is Irish and plays the guitar. The fake marriage/relationship turning into a real relationship is a common trope, but when the couple has ridiculous chemistry, it pays off so well. The chemistry between these two is great, and it helps that the banter is not too cheesy, and you know, the fact that Calvin is Irish. Also the supporting cast of characters is phenomenal; I want Holland's uncles to be my best friends.

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Dating You, Hating You (also by Christina Lauren) tells the story of Evie and Carter, two Hollywood agents who are immediately smitten with one another and start dating, but when their two agencies merge, they are pitted against each other to compete for the same job. The pranks the two pull on each other are hilarious, and the sexual tension is crazy ridiculous, but I really liked the two of them when they were just getting to know each other. The whole Hollywood agency plot line fell a little flat for me, so I had a hard time with the middle section of the book. But I did learn a little more about Hollywood and the difference between agents and managers. I really enjoyed the banter and chemistry between Evie and Carter. Also Carter’s nickname for Evie is Evil, which is pretty darn cute. This one was not one of my favorite romantic comedies, but this was a great example of the "thin line between love and hate" trope. 

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And now for the final book in Penny Reid’s Knitting in the City series, Marriage of Inconvenience. We have been waiting a long time for Kat’s story, and it just so happens that she and Dan the Security Man have been crushing hard on one another for the whole series. After a huge misunderstanding in Vegas at Janie’s bachelorette party, the two have avoided each other for two years. Kat is actually the billionaire heiress to one of the country’s biggest pharmaceutical companies. But her evil cousin wants to have her committed, claiming she is unfit to successfully take over the company, since her mother is a schizophrenic and her father has Alzheimer’s. The only solution to avoid her cousin taking guardianship is to get married. So she asks Dan, and naturally Dan accepts. Even though they both feel something for the other, neither one knows how the other feels. When they discover their mutual feelings, it should be easy to fall in love, but Kat has intimacy and self-worth issues, while Dan brings his parents’ messy relationship issues to the table. I have loved Dan since Neanderthal Seeks Human, so I was excited to finally get a book about Dan the Security Man. Kat has always been the quiet one of the group, so I loved seeing her grow into herself and take charge of her life in this book. This was the perfect way to wrap up the Knitting in the City series. As always, the knitting ladies show up for each other, and the bromance among all their guys is amazing. This series is a great starter into the romantic comedy genre if you are looking into it. I cannot say enough good things about Penny Reid and her smart characters. And I feel like I need to take up knitting. Who wants to start a knitting club?

Now I have to wait on Penny Reid’s other books that come out later this year. In the meantime, if I’m looking for more romantic comedies, I may reread Penny, and I definitely need to reread The Hating Game.

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